Volume 10 Supplement 2

Proceedings of the 1st French-Italian meeting on laminopathies and other nuclear envelope-related diseases

Open Access

Hypothalamic involvement in premature aging laminopathies

Orphanet Journal of Rare Diseases201510(Suppl 2):O6

https://doi.org/10.1186/1750-1172-10-S2-O6

Published: 11 November 2015

Caloric restriction (CR), the reduced intake of calories without malnutrition, extends lifespan of many organisms, from yeast to mammals, and delays the progression of age-related diseases. Evidence show that hypothalamus is a crucial brain region for the progress of whole-body aging[1] and the beneficial effects induced by CR are regulated by nutrient-sensing neurons located in the hypothalamus[2]. Although CR's beneficial effects in delaying human aging are promising, its application for long periods is very difficult to maintain and not feasible to apply to fragile children with progeria. To overcome this problem, the induction of protective endogenous mechanisms, or pharmacological agents, could theoretically be used to mimic the beneficial effects of CR without its discomfort. Our group showed that hypothalamus of Zmpste24-/- mouse has lower levels of Neuropeptide Y, comparing to wild-type animals. Moreover, they showed that targeting the Neuropeptide Y system in hypothalamus, as a CR mimetic strategy, delays or reverts some ageing features of Zmpste24-/- mice. Further studies are needed to confirm this innovative approach and if it could be translational to progeria children.

Authors’ Affiliations

(1)
CNC – Center for Neuroscience and Cell Biology, University of Coimbra, Coimbra, Portugal, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Coimbra

References

  1. Zhang G, Li J, Purkayastha S, Tang Y, Zhang H, Yin Y, et al: Hypothalamic programming of systemic ageing involving IKK-beta, NF-kappaB and GnRH. Nature. 2013, 497 (7448): 211-6.PubMedPubMed CentralView ArticleGoogle Scholar
  2. Dacks PA, Moreno CL, Kim ES, Marcellino BK, Mobbs CV: Role of the hypothalamus in mediating protective effects of dietary restriction during aging. Frontiers in neuroendocrinology. 2013, 34 (2): 95-106.PubMedPubMed CentralView ArticleGoogle Scholar

Copyright

© Cavadas 2015

This article is published under license to BioMed Central Ltd. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

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