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Table 3 Characteristics of the 11 to 14-year-old group

From: Oral health-related quality of life in children and adolescents with osteogenesis imperfecta: cross-sectional study

Patients aged between 10 and 14 OI I OI III OI IV Others All
Sociodemographic Characteristics
 Enrolment number – n (%) 39 (48) 14 (17) 23 (28) 6 (7) 82 (100)
  Female 22 (56) 11 (79) 14 (61) 4 (67) 51 (62)
 Age – mean (SD) 13.2 (1.3) 13.4 (1.1) 13.1 (1.2) 13.7 (1.2) 13.2 (1.2)
 Race (White) – n (%) 32 (82) 12 (86) 19 (83) 4 (67) 67 (82)
  others 7 (18) 2 (14) 4 (17) 2 (33) 15 (18)
 Insurance status (Private) – n (%) 26 (67) 9 (64) 14 (61) 3 (50) 52 (63)
  Medicare/Medicaid 13 (33) 5 (36) 9 (39) 3 (50) 30 (37)
Pertinent Medical and Physical Conditions
 Family history (Yes) – n (%) 23 (59) a 1 (7) 7 (30) 3 (50) 34 (41)
 Chronic pain in body (Yes) – n (%) 11 (28) a 10 (71) 9 (39) 4 (67) 34 (41)
 Bisphosphonate (Yes) – n (%) 20 (51) 14 (100) 21 (91) 4 (67) 59 (72)
 Wheelchair use (Yes) – n (%) 1 (3) a 13 (93) b 10 (43) c 4 (67) 28 (34)
Oral conditions
 DI (Yes) – n (%) 4 (10) a 8 (57) 11 (48) c 2 (33) 25 (30)
 Molar Malocclusion Classification – n (%)
  Cl I 22 (56) 0 (0) 5 (22) 3 (50) 30 (37)
  Cl III 8 (20) a 14 (100) b 13 (56) c 2 (33) 37 (45)
  Cl II & mutilated 9 (23) 0 (0) 5 (22) 1 (17) 15 (18)
  1. Statistical tests determine the significant relationship between categorical variables and OI types I, III and IV: Chi-square test or the Fisher’s exact test for contingency tables with small cell counts; Compare means of a continuous variable between OI types I, III and IV: Welch’s t-test for independent samples. As the sample size is small in each group (n < 15), results have been confirmed by Mann-Whitney U test (non-parametric test)
  2. ap < 0.05 OI type I compared to OI types III
  3. bp < 0.05 OI type III compared to OI types IV
  4. cp < 0.05 OI type IV compared to OI types I